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Liberia Battles Spreading Ebola Epidemic
Caption:MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 20: A member of the Church of Aladura prays on the beach on August 20, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. He and other church members said they were praying for God to rescue Liberia from its current crisis. The Ebola virus has killed more than 1,200 people in four African nations, with more in Liberia than any other country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Today is National Senior Citizens Day!

In celebration and adoration of our older generations check out our Senior Style video that redefines what it means to be old.

To find out more read the full story here: http://curve.gettyimages.com/article/senior-style

The Weird and The Wonderful - This week’s selection of offbeat photos

See more HERE

Rescue work continues following Hirsohima Landslide
Top:This aerial view shows the damage caused by a landslide after heavy rains hit the city of Hiroshima, western Japan, on August 20, 2014. At least 18 people were killed and another 13 were still missing after a huge landslide engulfed homes in western Japan, reports said on August 20. JAPAN OUT (Photo credit should read JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)

Bottom:HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - AUGUST 21: Local residents visit a landslide site to check if their house are damaged by a landslide caused by torrential rain on August 21, 2014 in Hiroshima, Japan. Rescue work continues as at least 39 people were confirmed dead and 7 people are missing one day after the torrential rain caused flooding and landslides in the city of Hiroshima early Wednesday August 20, 2014. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)

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Kate Adie on the women of WW1 | InFocus

Kate Adie, former BBC Chief News Correspondent discusses how the societal role of women changed during WW1.

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GAZA CITY : Five Palestinian men sit on August 20, 2014 next to a destroyed bus and houses in front of a house that was completely demolished after it was targeted by Israeli airstrikes late on August 19. Hamas said on August 20 that an Israeli air strike killed the wife and child of its Gaza military chief, as a temporary ceasefire went up in smoke and Cairo truce talks froze. AFP PHOTO/ ROBERTO SCHMIDT

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Jonathan Torgovnik was awarded a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography in 2007 for his project “Intended Consequences.” Torgovnik followed 50 women who were raped during the Rwandan genocide in 1994, and who bore children as a result. The project was built through a series of narratives constructed from environmental portraits, audio interviews and textual reflections. “Intended Consequences” led to the creation of Foundation Rwanda, which provides assistance to the mothers and children.

2014 marks the tenth anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

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UKRAINE, MAKEYEVKA : A woman holds her baby as they evacuate by bus from the town of Makeyevka on August 18, 2014. Ukraine on August 18 accused pro-Russian rebels of shelling a convoy of civilians fleeing the war-torn east, leaving “many” dead, as crisis talks to halt months of bloodshed failed to make a breakthrough. AFP PHOTO / DIMITAR DILKOFF

Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images Photo by Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images

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Study Estimates 100,000 Elephants Killed in Last 3 Years

The continued demand for ivory from China and elsewhere in Asia has led to a dramatic decline in Africa’s elephant populations in the last decade, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Extrapolating from local population estimates, the authors estimated that 100,000 elephants have been killed in the last three years and that, in central Africa, the regional population has declined by 64 percent in the last decade. Read more about this study on National Geographic’s website.

Reportage photographer Brent Stirton documented the illicit ivory trade, and efforts to combat poachers, in 2011 and 2012. In his resulting story, “God’s Ivory,” Brent vividly illustrated the connection between poaching in Africa and demand for religious and cultural icons made from ivory in Asia.

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Top: The largest mass killing of elephants in recent history took place at Bouba Ndjida National Park in North Cameroon close to the Chad and Central African Republic Borders from January through March 2012.

Middle: The preparation for the burning of 5 tons of trafficked Ivory recovered from a seizure in Singapore in 2002, Manyani, Tsavo, Kenya, July 20, 2011.

Bottom: Ivory on sale at government registered White Peacock Arts World, Beijing, China, November 15, 2011.

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'Although antiretroviral drugs were available in the States and throughout Europe they were nonexistent in Africa at that time. The cost of medicine and the surrounding treatment were price prohibitive in countries where the majority of people live off $2 a day.

While documenting this crisis I chose to focus on the stories of individuals. The scope of the pandemic was too widespread. My images exist as a record of people I met who lost their lives to AIDS, as a reminder that countless others seek access to life saving drugs and that children orphaned by the disease need our help.’

-Kristen Ashburn, winner of the Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography 2006 for her project Bloodline.

2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

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